• A Letter for Corpus Christi

    A Letter for Corpus Christi
    The Rev'd Michael Godderz
    5 Jun 18

    My Dear Folk,

    As our program year draws to a close, I want to update you all on some building matters since I last addressed this subject in the fall. 

    Most immediately obvious to all was the water leak onto the Fisk organ in January.  Those arriving for Sunday’s Masses on the fourteenth found the organ at the back of the church once again encased in protective plastic, just as it had been during the building renovations.

  • A Letter for Holy Week and Easter

    A Letter for Holy Week and Easter
    The Rev'd Michael Godderz
    16 Mar 18

    My Dear Folk,

    When I was in grade school, I learned how to play the clarinet.  My older sister had played one, ultimately in the University of Minnesota marching band.  So the instrument was there to be handed down. When the chance for musical instruction in my school became available, my parents thought it would be a good idea for me as well.  I have to admit that I was an indifferent musician. I didn’t like to practice, and therefore seldom did. My progress reflected that fact.

  • A Letter for Lent

    A Letter for Lent
    The Rev'd Michael Godderz
    10 Feb 18

    Recently I stumbled on something written by Fr. Darwin Kirby. His name is probably not recognized by many today, but he was a major figure in the American Anglo-Catholic movement. I am sharing that column which Fr. Kirby wrote. In it you catch a glimpse of the passionate, vigorous faith which he proclaimed – the faith which is the true hope of the world. As we begin this Lent, we would all do well to attend to his words.

  • A Letter for Christmas

    A Letter for Christmas
    The Rev'd Michael Godderz
    25 Dec 17

    My dear folk,

    I don’t know why it should, but I’m always surprised at how often people tell me of their memories of Christmas Eve Mass. If asked for a particularly precious memory of something in our Christian life, I suspect that for many of us it would involve that beautiful and time- honored service. There’s no criticism in that. Indeed, I have to plead guilty myself: one of the most vivid memories of my first year in Holy Orders is of preparing the altar at the Midnight Mass while the congregation lifted their voices singing “O Come All Ye Faithful.”

  • A Letter for Advent

    A Letter for Advent
    The Rev'd Michael Godderz
    4 Dec 17

    My dear folk,

    “Remember, O man, that thou art dust, and unto dust shalt thou return.” I can’t help but think that those words, so familiar to us from their use at the imposition of ashes on Ash Wednesday as we begin the season of Lent, might be equally the call to our observation of Advent. Who are we; what shall we be, but for God’s saving grace. We see this emphasis reflected in the four traditional themes of Advent:

  • A Letter for Michaelmas

    A Letter for Michaelmas
    The Rev'd Michael Godderz
    29 Sep 17

    My dear folk,

    This Michaelmas marks the nineteenth anniversary of my installation as Rector. That’s rather a sobering reflection for me. It doesn’t seem all that long ago that Ruth and I were feverishly working to complete our move into the Rectory and get the house ready for the institution guests. Indeed, Fr. Mead and Nancy arrived at the house as I was on the third floor replacing a broken light socket in a bedroom sconce. Yet on the other hand, I must confess that I begin to feel as though I have been here indefinitely as year follows year..

  • A Letter for Corpus Christi

    A Letter for Corpus Christi
    The Rev'd F. Washington Jarvis
    5 Jun 18

    To the Beloved in Christ at Ashmont
    Dear Friends,

    “At the Episcopal Church you get something to eat.”  So spoke a visiting fellow Boy Scout after attending mass at my boyhood parish, St. James’ Church in Painesville, Ohio, in the 1950's.  My friend was a Presbyterian, and they had “The Lord’s Supper” only four times a year.

    In simple ter

  • A Letter for Holy Week and Easter

    A Letter for Holy Week and Easter
    The Rev'd F. Washington Jarvis
    15 Mar 18

    To the Beloved in Christ at Ashmont
    Dear Friends,

        Here we are late in Lent.  It is nearly time to stop and contemplate the conclusion of our Lenten pilgrimage:  the Triduum – Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and the Easter Vigil, when we gather at church all three nights at 7.

        Our purpose in gathering on those three nights is to “s

  • A Letter for Lent

    A Letter for Lent
    The Rev'd F. Washington Jarvis
    9 Feb 18

    To the Beloved in Christ at Ashmont

    Dear Friends,

    My beloved mother was forever announcing dates when she would once again begin some project of self-improvement: “After the Fourth of July, I shall....” After Labor Day, I shall....” After Christmas (New year’s resolution), I shall....” And, of course, most of all: “When Lent comes, I shall...

  • A Letter for Christmas

    A Letter for Christmas
    The Rev'd F. Washington Jarvis
    24 Dec 17

    To the Beloved in Christ at Ashmont

    Dear Friends,

    There’s a special providence in the fall of a sparrow. If it be now, tis not to come. If it not be now, yet it will come – the readiness is all.

    Shakespeare, Hamlet, Act 5, Scene 2

  • A Letter for Advent

    A Letter for Advent
    The Rev'd F. Washington Jarvis
    1 Dec 17

    To the Beloved in Christ at Ashmont

    Dear Friends,

    Advent is about judgment. “Repent!” shouts John the Baptist. “You brood of vipers.  Who warned you to flee from the wrath to come?”

    Unfortunately, some parishes today are offering a false-Christianity that is judgment-free.

  • A Letter for Corpus Christi

    A Letter for Corpus Christi
    The Rev'd James Nuzzo
    5 Jun 18

    We are in Processiontide – that series of feasts and festivals many of which also have processions associated with them.  Soon it will be over as will be another academic year. The choir will go on its well-deserved break for the summer and things will become quieter.  As I have written in previous editions of this particular Chronicle in years pas

  • A Letter for Holy Week and Easter

    A Letter for Holy Week and Easter
    The Rev'd James Nuzzo
    15 Mar 18

    One of the favorite topics of conversation as Spring comes in full bloom is where people will take their vacation.  That is a trip to somewhere away where ones physical and emotional batteries can be recharged. “You going down the Cape? We hope to go back to the Islands.” and other such conversations seem to be in the air in Peabody Hall during the

  • A Letter for Lent

    A Letter for Lent
    The Rev'd James Nuzzo
    10 Feb 18

    Right now, as we sit in this church that is warmed by a finicky but functional heating plant we might take a moment to think of a group of men who have taken St. Paul’s admonition in today’s New Testament lesson to heart in their daily lives. Up in a secluded valley in Vermont lies a structure that is made of rough-hewn blocks of Vermont granite. T

  • A Letter for Christmas

    A Letter for Christmas
    The Rev'd James Nuzzo
    25 Dec 17

    My dear sisters and brothers in Christ,

    We all remember the Nativity story by heart. Joseph and Mary travel by donkey to Bethlehem to be counted in the census that the Emperor commanded in order to lay out the tax burden for the coming years. But why Bethlehem? Again the narrative puts a simple case, that it was the hometown of Joseph’s family. Jose

  • A Letter for Advent

    A Letter for Advent
    The Rev'd James Nuzzo
    2 Dec 17

    My dear sisters and brothers in Christ,

    When I was a high school student I was involved with a contemporary play by Samuel Beckett called “Waiting for Godot” which was about two men who are waiting and waiting and waiting for this important person called Godot to arrive.  They speak about Godot, interact with a couple of strange characters and spend

  • A Letter for Corpus Christi

    A Letter for Corpus Christi
    Andrew Sheranian
    5 Jun 18

    Recently I was asked to comment on something about our parish that I find noteworthy... what I find most special about All Saints is one word: silence.

  • A Letter for Holy Week and Easter

    A Letter for Holy Week and Easter
    Andrew Sheranian
    15 Mar 18

    As many of our parishioners have noticed, Ross Wood has been accompanying the choir here on a regular basis for the past few months, and it is with great pleasure that I announce that he has agreed to join the music staff of the parish as Associate Organist. For many years Ross was the organist at two distinguished parishes here in Boston: Trinity

  • A Letter for Lent

    A Letter for Lent
    Andrew Sheranian
    10 Feb 18

    One of the riches of our Anglo-Catholic heritage is the fact that we get to chant the Great Litany in procession, not once or twice a year, but five times: twice in Advent and thrice in Lent. I must confess that in previous years, the Litany has been challenging for me. From time to time I have fallen prey to impatience at its length; at other time

  • A Letter for Christmas

    A Letter for Christmas
    Andrew Sheranian
    25 Dec 17

    Since the last issue of The Chronicle, the choir has grown even more, adding one more boy to the ranks. Our latest addition to the choir was sent to us by his piano teacher, who is a former choir mother! It’s been such a blessing to see the choir grow in numbers - something for which we have been praying for years!

  • A Letter for Advent

    A Letter for Advent
    Andrew Sheranian
    2 Dec 17

    The past few months have been filled with joy and wonder, as the choir continues to grow both in numbers and in ability. We have six new choirboys, and we thank God for their presence among us. How did these new boys come into the choir?

We are in Processiontide – that series of feasts and festivals many of which also have processions associated with them.  Soon it will be over as will be another academic year. The choir will go on its well-deserved break for the summer and things will become quieter.  As I have written in previous editions of this particular Chronicle in years past, just because you are on vacation from work, does not mean that you are on vacation from God. 

As Anglicans, even as Anglo-Catholics, there is no church law, as have the Romans, that you must attend Mass every Sunday or it is a mortal sin. Going to church should not be, and we as Anglicans do not see it as a duty that must be performed for fear of committing a mortal sin.  Rather, it should be joyously embraced as our opportunity to spend time devoted to being with God in the company of other believers.

Both parts of that last sentence are critical:  we should wish to have time to commune with God but as Christians, unless we are one of those rare individuals called to the hermit life, we do so as part of a community of other believers.  Being in community anchors us to the primal idea that the Church is not a group of atomistic individuals who just happen to gather together at particular times but a collective that worships God together and that our journey through this “Vale of Tears” is inextricably tied to other people.  On a more pragmatic note, going to a worship service can act as a nudge to us when a few more hours of sleep seem so much more appealing than getting dressed for church.

When I was in college, my then girlfriend’s mother used to ask her where she went to church on Sundays.  She would invariably mutter, “The Cathedral of the Pines,” meaning that she would take hikes on Sunday morning.  Much to her and my surprise, her mother asked on Parents’ Weekend to go to the Cathedral with us. We were convinced that we were in deep trouble as her mother was a very no-nonsense person and the idea that she had been told a fib some months ago would not have gone down well for either of us.  But lo and behold, we looked at an atlas and there is an actual Cathedral of the Pines in New Hampshire-a complete coincidence I assure you. But a promise to God that if we got out of the jam we would go to church is a promise and we made sure to be in a church every Sunday thereafter.

Maybe make an adventure out of it (as it was as we three drove to the Cathedral that Sunday morning, trying to act [in pre-GPS days] that we knew where we were going and had been there before).  Find a new church you haven’t ever visited before and take in the experience. If there isn’t an Anglo-Catholic parish where you are staying, check out another church – There is a great book that you probably can read on line called How to be a Perfect Stranger that will give you a taste of how to behave if you visit a different type of worship community.  Perhaps something at that worship service, which may be different than what you are used to every Sunday here, might make an impression-maybe the freshness will open your heart in a way that sometimes can be difficult at one’s home parish.  Such an experience is not to be feared but something to be embraced as God opens us to His message in various ways. That doesn’t mean you will cease being Anglo-Catholic (Heaven forfend!) but that you were open to the Spirit moving you in a different environment.   Try to feel what people in that tradition or that parish find so appealing, what ways God is moving in them.

Come back and tell us where you went and what it was like. I have a favor-I really enjoy reading other church bulletins.  Bring some back with you. But remember that no matter how far you roam, there is no place like home and we look forward to seeing you and worshiping together when you return.

Have a safe and blessed summer.

Under the Mercy,
Father James

 

fr nuzzo gospel

Service Times

Sundays

7:30 a.m. Morning Prayer
8:00 a.m. Low Mass
9:00 a.m. Adult Christian Education*
10:00 a.m. Solemn Mass
11:30 a.m. Coffee Hour

* during the academic year

Weekdays

Low Mass
Wednesday 10 a.m. *
Friday 7 a.m.
Saturday 9 a.m.

* followed by coffee hour

 

Location and Parking

209 Ashmont Street
Dorchester MA 02124
(617) 436-6370

Map

All Saints is located in the south Dorchester neighborhood of Boston, just off Peabody Square, at 209 Ashmont St. and is a very short walk from the Ashmont T station on the Red Line. (Click icon for map.)

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The five principal levels of our buildings are handicap accessible, served by a five-stop elevator. Handicap access into both buildings is by a walkway and ADA-compliant ramp from the parking lot to the Ashmont Street door of the church.  There are handicap accessible bathrooms on four levels of the church and parish house.

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There is a private parking lot for 47 cars and on-street parking on both Ashmont Street and on the other streets surrounding the church.

Four of these spaces are reserved for Zipcars.

Parish of All Saints, Ashmont

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Our emphasis at the Parish of All Saints is on sacramental worship (the Mass or Holy Eucharist) celebrated in a traditional Anglo-Catholic style, with strong orthodox teaching and preaching, supportive pastoral care, a caring parish family, and responsibility to our community and the greater world.

 
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