• A Letter for Corpus Christi

    A Letter for Corpus Christi
    The Rev'd Michael Godderz
    5 Jun 18

    My Dear Folk,

    As our program year draws to a close, I want to update you all on some building matters since I last addressed this subject in the fall. 

    Most immediately obvious to all was the water leak onto the Fisk organ in January.  Those arriving for Sunday’s Masses on the fourteenth found the organ at the back of the church once again encased in protective plastic, just as it had been during the building renovations.

  • A Letter for Holy Week and Easter

    A Letter for Holy Week and Easter
    The Rev'd Michael Godderz
    16 Mar 18

    My Dear Folk,

    When I was in grade school, I learned how to play the clarinet.  My older sister had played one, ultimately in the University of Minnesota marching band.  So the instrument was there to be handed down. When the chance for musical instruction in my school became available, my parents thought it would be a good idea for me as well.  I have to admit that I was an indifferent musician. I didn’t like to practice, and therefore seldom did. My progress reflected that fact.

  • A Letter for Lent

    A Letter for Lent
    The Rev'd Michael Godderz
    10 Feb 18

    Recently I stumbled on something written by Fr. Darwin Kirby. His name is probably not recognized by many today, but he was a major figure in the American Anglo-Catholic movement. I am sharing that column which Fr. Kirby wrote. In it you catch a glimpse of the passionate, vigorous faith which he proclaimed – the faith which is the true hope of the world. As we begin this Lent, we would all do well to attend to his words.

  • A Letter for Christmas

    A Letter for Christmas
    The Rev'd Michael Godderz
    25 Dec 17

    My dear folk,

    I don’t know why it should, but I’m always surprised at how often people tell me of their memories of Christmas Eve Mass. If asked for a particularly precious memory of something in our Christian life, I suspect that for many of us it would involve that beautiful and time- honored service. There’s no criticism in that. Indeed, I have to plead guilty myself: one of the most vivid memories of my first year in Holy Orders is of preparing the altar at the Midnight Mass while the congregation lifted their voices singing “O Come All Ye Faithful.”

  • Christmas at All Saints

    Christmas at All Saints
    The Rev'd Michael Godderz
    25 Dec 17

    My dear folk,

    Enclosed with this letter you will find All Saints’ Christmas schedule. Let me offer a few words about what is to come in the next few weeks.

  • A word from... Fr. Jarvis?

    A word from... Fr. Jarvis?
    The Rev'd Michael Godderz
    25 Dec 17

    My dear folk,

    There is a wonderful prescription for Lent which Fr. Jarvis frequently offered.  My first experience of it was in what he wrote for Lent issue of The Chronicle just before I was called to be Rector.  I thought it was spot on. It was the only thing which made me feel a tinge of regret when that call was extended to me: I thought I never be able to use his concise and direct advice.  Let’s just say that I’ve decided I was wrong – and that I've brazenly stolen that bit of wisdom and have been using it ever since.

        His advice for Lent was very simply put: Give up, pick up, & shut up.

  • A Letter for Corpus Christi

    A Letter for Corpus Christi
    The Rev'd F. Washington Jarvis
    5 Jun 18

    To the Beloved in Christ at Ashmont
    Dear Friends,

    “At the Episcopal Church you get something to eat.”  So spoke a visiting fellow Boy Scout after attending mass at my boyhood parish, St. James’ Church in Painesville, Ohio, in the 1950's.  My friend was a Presbyterian, and they had “The Lord’s Supper” only four times a year.

    In simple ter

  • A Letter for Holy Week and Easter

    A Letter for Holy Week and Easter
    The Rev'd F. Washington Jarvis
    15 Mar 18

    To the Beloved in Christ at Ashmont
    Dear Friends,

        Here we are late in Lent.  It is nearly time to stop and contemplate the conclusion of our Lenten pilgrimage:  the Triduum – Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and the Easter Vigil, when we gather at church all three nights at 7.

        Our purpose in gathering on those three nights is to “s

  • A Letter for Lent

    A Letter for Lent
    The Rev'd F. Washington Jarvis
    9 Feb 18

    To the Beloved in Christ at Ashmont

    Dear Friends,

    My beloved mother was forever announcing dates when she would once again begin some project of self-improvement: “After the Fourth of July, I shall....” After Labor Day, I shall....” After Christmas (New year’s resolution), I shall....” And, of course, most of all: “When Lent comes, I shall...

  • A Letter for Christmas

    A Letter for Christmas
    The Rev'd F. Washington Jarvis
    24 Dec 17

    To the Beloved in Christ at Ashmont

    Dear Friends,

    There’s a special providence in the fall of a sparrow. If it be now, tis not to come. If it not be now, yet it will come – the readiness is all.

    Shakespeare, Hamlet, Act 5, Scene 2

  • A Letter for Advent

    A Letter for Advent
    The Rev'd F. Washington Jarvis
    1 Dec 17

    To the Beloved in Christ at Ashmont

    Dear Friends,

    Advent is about judgment. “Repent!” shouts John the Baptist. “You brood of vipers.  Who warned you to flee from the wrath to come?”

    Unfortunately, some parishes today are offering a false-Christianity that is judgment-free.

  • A Letter for Corpus Christi

    A Letter for Corpus Christi
    Andrew Sheranian
    5 Jun 18

    Recently I was asked to comment on something about our parish that I find noteworthy... what I find most special about All Saints is one word: silence.

  • A Letter for Holy Week and Easter

    A Letter for Holy Week and Easter
    Andrew Sheranian
    15 Mar 18

    As many of our parishioners have noticed, Ross Wood has been accompanying the choir here on a regular basis for the past few months, and it is with great pleasure that I announce that he has agreed to join the music staff of the parish as Associate Organist. For many years Ross was the organist at two distinguished parishes here in Boston: Trinity

  • A Letter for Lent

    A Letter for Lent
    Andrew Sheranian
    10 Feb 18

    One of the riches of our Anglo-Catholic heritage is the fact that we get to chant the Great Litany in procession, not once or twice a year, but five times: twice in Advent and thrice in Lent. I must confess that in previous years, the Litany has been challenging for me. From time to time I have fallen prey to impatience at its length; at other time

  • A Letter for Christmas

    A Letter for Christmas
    Andrew Sheranian
    25 Dec 17

    Since the last issue of The Chronicle, the choir has grown even more, adding one more boy to the ranks. Our latest addition to the choir was sent to us by his piano teacher, who is a former choir mother! It’s been such a blessing to see the choir grow in numbers - something for which we have been praying for years!

  • A Letter for Advent

    A Letter for Advent
    Andrew Sheranian
    2 Dec 17

    The past few months have been filled with joy and wonder, as the choir continues to grow both in numbers and in ability. We have six new choirboys, and we thank God for their presence among us. How did these new boys come into the choir?

My dear folk,

This Michaelmas marks the nineteenth anniversary of my installation as Rector. That’s rather a sobering reflection for me. It doesn’t seem all that long ago that Ruth and I were feverishly working to complete our move into the Rectory and get the house ready for the institution guests. Indeed, Fr. Mead and Nancy arrived at the house as I was on the third floor replacing a broken light socket in a bedroom sconce. Yet on the other hand, I must confess that I begin to feel as though I have been here indefinitely as year follows year..

It’s rather like asking Ruth about some experience we’d shared in the long past, only to realize that we wouldn’t even have met at that time. While I’d like to think that this dynamic shows that I’ve finally mastered the art of “living in the present moment” I’m afraid that forgetfulness may be the more convincing explanation. But back to my point: coming to All Saints’ has been one of the greatest joys of my life. I continue to give God thanks for this blessing and to rejoice in your fellowship in the midst of this earthly pilgrimage.

As we start a new program year, I though I’d take the opportunity to bring you all up to date on several things in our parish life.

It is a delight to have Andrew Sheranian back from his sabbatical. During his time away he had the opportunity to observe rehearsals and services of some of the finest men and boy choirs in England, including St. John’s College in Cambridge, King’s College in Cambridge, St. Alban’s Abbey, Rochester Cathedral, Temple Church in London, as well as Westminster Abbey. It is, of course, this tradition which we hope to emulate in our parish setting. Later, he was able to hear a number of significant organs in Germany, including a visit to St. Thomas Church, Leipzig, where Bach served. In the midst of that sabbatical time he returned to take a number of our trebles to Massachusetts (formerly Montreal) Boy Choir Course for the last week in July, culminating in two glorious choral services at Trinity Church, Copley Square. He then led our own treble choir camp in Essex, New York, in August. He also performed concerts at the University of Utah and on the Great Organ in the Methuen Memorial Music Hall. And, of course, he was here to play and conduct the choir for our Assumption Mass. It was a full and rewarding time. And as a parish we look forward to enjoying the fruits of his growth as a musician and from the insights gained from his exposure to these most excellent choirs and instruments.

We owe a great debt of gratitude to Michael Raleigh (our former Davison Fellow, now Associate Conductor) who led the choir through the end of the choral season, as well as Daryl Bichel and Lee Ridgway who played the services and accompanied the choir, and then provided musical leadership for our services through the summer. How fortunate we were to have such fine musicians able and willing to step in and provide for the continuing needs of the parish! That there are long-standing relationships with each was icing on the cake.

The other matter I want to address is, of course, the Building Restoration project. There are times when I begin to feel that this topic could well take the title from a children’s book: The Neverending Story. Many are surprised to hear that the project has not been completed yet. After all, the building no longer looks like it’s under construction, and we’ve even had a special service – two years ago at that – to celebrate the restoration. The truth of the matter is that while most of the work has been completed for several years, we still are working at the punch list. This was a massive project; it is not surprising that there was a substantial punch list, items not yet completed or which have been discovered to need further work or correction. But quite frankly, the completion of the punch list has taken far, far longer than it should have (possibly exacerbated by the boom in the construction business which Boston has experienced). So while on the surface it may have appeared that the project was wrapped up, there nevertheless has been a lot of effort expended behind the scenes. Monitoring systems, inspecting for problems, documenting issues were all the more important since the construction managers and contractors have not been on site regularly as they were prior to demobilization in January 2015. The good news is that the punch list is, for all intents and purposes, completed with the exception of two major areas: water intrusion and the heating system.

We have experienced a number of leaks, mainly in the tower, the Lady Chapel, and the St. Mary’s aisle. Since these roofs were completely replaced, along with the flashing, gutters, and downspouts, this has been disappointing and puzzling. Water leaks are also notoriously hard to locate, for the water can enter the building at one point and then travel some distance before it passes out of the wall or ceiling; it’s not simply a matter of looking directly above the puddle on the floor. Wind intensity and direction also have a large role in water intrusion. A particular leak may only appear in a gusty northeaster, and be sound and dry through heavy downpours or if the wind is from the west. Interestingly, water leaks were a problem even when the building was first built. In our archives I came across an issue of The Chronicle from around 1904. Fr. Whittemore wrote of some work about to be done which was hoped would bring an end to the leaks which had plagued the building from its construction. Let me just say that this is one area in which I do not want to continue an All Saints’ tradition.

Significant work has been done on the heating system this past year. Over a year ago a new HVAC subcontractor was brought onto the job. Five radiators in the Parish House were replaced: those originally installed were smaller than what was called for in design, and therefore provided less heat than needed. That, and the lack of the specified balancing valves, resulted in Peabody Hall and the Guild Hall being difficult to get up to temperature. There just wasn’t enough heating capacity in the room. Those new radiators were installed last fall; the difference was remarkable. We also experienced unacceptable levels of noise from two of the three air handler units for the chancel, nave, and Lady Chapel. Heat in those conjoined areas is provided from the basement level by means of ducts passing through the floor in the aisles and the wall of the Lady Chapel. Air is heated by hot water radiators in the air handler units and then forced by fans into the church. The noise from these two units was so distracting that we would turn them off during services. Last fall the duct work for the chancel air handler was altered and a silencer was installed. Unfortunately, the problem with the air handler for the Lady Chapel could not be dealt with in the same way. After considering various possibilities and the very tight space available around the unit, our acoustical consultants came up with a solution: incorporating in the ductwork a plenum (a large metal box, lined with acoustical padding, with a duct bringing in the heated air and another duct on the other side directing it to the room). That work has now been completed and the noise from these two units has now been reduced to acceptable levels. Finally, there are some areas in the computerized controls for the heating system which need work, but the work on the hardware (boilers, pipes, valves, etc.) needs to be completed before addressing problems arising from software.

When these issues are resolved, we will be able to proceed to the remaining inspections, receive our new occupancy permit, and have the final close-out of the project. This is a consummation devoutly to be wished. Your building committee will no doubt entreat the Choir for a Solemn Te Deum in thanksgiving when the last inspection is completed, all the accounting settled, and the final reports are sent to the generous and patient foundations which have been our benefactors.

In addition to the restoration project itself, there are several other building-related matters to be noted. The beautiful black and white marble floor in the St. Stephen’s Chapel was restored in the Spring. Some scratches and stains which occurred during the restoration work were removed. We took off multiple layers of floor polish (which should not be used on marble). The floor was then honed and polished. The result is wonderful; if you’ve not seen it, I urge you to take a look. St. Stephen’s Chapel is an artistic treasure. I first saw St. Stephen’s Chapel when Ruth and I worshipped here in the late 1980's, while I was on vacation from my parish in Vermont. How well I remember being stunned by its beauty as I caught a glimpse while returning to our pew after receiving the Sacrament. I still feel that stab of wonder and joy each time I approach that altar to celebrate the Holy Mysteries.

During the building restoration, we were not able to sand and refinish the floor in the choir room. This was a matter of balancing our many needs with the realities of our budget. The choir room was also a distinct area which could be easily addressed by itself at a later time. This summer we were able to do just that. The result is beautiful to see and protects the original floor in this heavily used space. While on site, the flooring contractor also made repairs to a number of floorboards in the church and the cloister which were loose or damaged (you may have noticed pieces of blue painters tape marking those spots until our job could be fitted into their schedule).

Finally, many have mentioned to me the lack of a church sign. Our old metal sign was removed during the restoration; the temporary plywood sandwich sign was more than due to be retired. Although originally part of the restoration project, difficulties in finding a fabricator for the new sign led to it being dropped from the project. We now have found a craftsman whose work is of the quality we desire. The design has been refined and is at the point for final approval. We hope to move forward with fabrication and installation as soon as it is possible for him to do this work.

Yours, in his service,

Michael J. Godderz+

 

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(Ruth Godderz)

Service Times

Sundays

7:30 a.m. Morning Prayer
8:00 a.m. Low Mass
9:00 a.m. Adult Christian Education*
10:00 a.m. Solemn Mass
11:30 a.m. Coffee Hour

* during the academic year

Weekdays

Low Mass
Wednesday 10 a.m. *
Friday 7 a.m.
Saturday 9 a.m.

* followed by coffee hour

 

Location and Parking

209 Ashmont Street
Dorchester MA 02124
(617) 436-6370

Map

All Saints is located in the south Dorchester neighborhood of Boston, just off Peabody Square, at 209 Ashmont St. and is a very short walk from the Ashmont T station on the Red Line. (Click icon for map.)

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The five principal levels of our buildings are handicap accessible, served by a five-stop elevator. Handicap access into both buildings is by a walkway and ADA-compliant ramp from the parking lot to the Ashmont Street door of the church.  There are handicap accessible bathrooms on four levels of the church and parish house.

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There is a private parking lot for 47 cars and on-street parking on both Ashmont Street and on the other streets surrounding the church.

Four of these spaces are reserved for Zipcars.

Parish of All Saints, Ashmont

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Our emphasis at the Parish of All Saints is on sacramental worship (the Mass or Holy Eucharist) celebrated in a traditional Anglo-Catholic style, with strong orthodox teaching and preaching, supportive pastoral care, a caring parish family, and responsibility to our community and the greater world.

 
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